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Cranberry and Meyer Lemon Scones

January 10, 2012

For the past couple years around Christmas I’ve been stocking up on fresh cranberries.  And then every April (or at least the last two Aprils) when I  moved out, I had cranberries in my freezer that I never did get around to baking with, and I gave them away.   This year I am determined that I really will use them.  I decided that cranberry-lemon sounded like a good combination, so on a recent trip the store I picked up a bag of Meyer lemons, which were on sale.  I’ve never bought them before, although I had heard about them through the blogosphere.  For those of you unfamiliar with Meyer lemons, they are a cross between a lemon and a tangerine, have a thinner skin and are less tart than a regular lemon.  For more information, this NPR article is pretty interesting.

Armed with my lemons, I started searching online for cranberry-lemon recipes.   I came across a scone recipe that sounded good, but required whipping cream.  So I settled on making muffins instead.  (I’ll share that recipe soon after I make them again– I need to tweak the recipe a bit!)

One of the local grocery stores has a terrible habit of overstocking on whipping cream, and so the last time I was there they had all sorts of about-to-expire cream going for 50% off.  I bought some and whipped some scones up.   Normally I put butter on scones (and the orignal recipe recommends serving these with whipped cream) but these are delicious as is with just a cup of tea.  They have the perfect combination of sweet-tartness.

Cranberry and Meyer Lemon Scones

(makes 16; adapted from Epicurious)

1 1/4 cups fresh cranberries
2 tbsp Meyer lemon zest (or whatever the zest of two lemons equals)
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup sugar plus 2 tablespoons
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold  butter, cut into pieces
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
1 cup whipping cream

Preheat oven to 400°F.   Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

Using a food processor, coarsely chop cranberries.  Remove to a small bowl and stir together with 2 tbsp sugar.  Wipe out food processor, then pulse lemon zest, flour, 1/2 cup sugar, baking powder, salt, and butter until mixture makes coarse crumbs.  Remove and transfer to large bowl.  Stir in the cranberry-sugar mixture.

In another small bowl, beat egg and yolk and stir in cream. Add egg mixture to flour mixture and stir until just combined.  Mixture will be very sticky. Arrange rounds about 1 inch apart on baking sheet and bake in middle of oven 15 to 20 minutes, or until pale golden.

Divide dough into two parts and pat out each section into a circle on a well-floured surface.  Cut each piece into 8 wedges.  Transfer each wedge to baking sheet, leaving about 1″ between each scone.  Bake for 10-20 minutes, checking to ensure bottoms do not brown too quickly. (I patted out my dough rather thin so my scones baked quickly.  Thicker scones make take closer to 15 or 20 minutes.  Next time I’d go the thicker route.)

Store scones in the fridge or freezer, reheating in the microwave if desired.

I actually halved this recipe, and only made 8 scones.  But I didn’t type it out that way because that requires half an egg and half a yolk.  However, if you have a kitchen scale, you can easily combine the whole egg and yolk, weigh it, and then figure out half.  I scrambled the other half for breakfast.

Do you bake with cranberries?  Have you ever used Meyer lemons?  Do you like tea and scones?

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. jennie frances permalink
    January 11, 2012 10:20 am

    These look delicious. 🙂

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